40 thoughts on “Harbinger

  1. So true and timely. Most futurist get it wrong. Orwell was very insightful. So was C.S. Lewis. His Screwtape Proposes a Toast is dead on when looking at education and issue we have these days.

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    1. Dear Tim, apologies for the tardy reply. I found your comment in SPAM, WP?! If a few more release your comments it should reset the parameters that targeted your comments.

      Very insightful, a most uncomfortable honesty. Thankfully Orwell’s thoughts and beliefs will live on in his words, that is if the book-burning can be avoided. The things I’ve seen of late demonstrates the mentality of the oppressors. Very sad indeed.

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          1. Oh Tim, I have to edit and watch myself these days as to what I say v. what I don’t say. That in itself is rather sickening. Through these oddball posts I’m attempting to give some sort of voice to the happenings around us without offending too many.

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    1. Hi Ogden! Is the truth bleak? Most probably, no one likes ugly. Do you find Gordon Comstock to be a version of Orwell? You know, somewhat autobiographical? Extremes are interesting, maybe even telling, and maybe this could be considered a confessional of self-loathing, yet salvation is always within reach. Hmm. . . how’s about that? πŸ™‚ (I think we’re all salvageable. πŸ˜‰ ) I hope all is well with you and yours, thank you for your visit, I do appreciate it tremendously! Meow! >^.^<

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      1. Ah well yes, I think he does reveal himself in the book, tho I expect Comstock would be a compilation of characters. I liked H G Wells as a writer of early socialist ideas – I don’t think I ever read his book “A Modern Utopia” (I once saw a film version in B/W) but I think I shall look into that now I think of it. I read his crazy book “Tono Bungay” – that was some crazy story! Very Dickensian! Well, approaching 1984 as science fiction is probably not the way its intended. It was harder for Orwell to be positive than it was for Wells I expect, since by his time history had gone somewhat rotten, I like to see how modernity was represented in books from that period, say mid 1800’s to mid 1900’s – all amazing ideas, high ideals and all that. Nowadays we ask ourselves where we’re going and what we’re doing, and the answer is usually just some mad argument! How will these times look 100 years from now? Lets see, maybe not too bad, we hope! πŸ˜€ XX

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          1. This is crazy stuff! Quite sweet really, I saw this on TV one afternoon years ago – I think he captures something of the spirit which Orwell overlooks, but then Orwell is the better writer, he goes deeper, and is as you say, more truthful.

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          2. Thank you! “We live in interesting, exciting and anxious times.” How spot on. This is an eclectic mix of futuristic dramatic Roman looking characters, as well as a compilation of fabricated newsreels and their fantastic flying machines. I haven’t seen, “Things to Come”, comically terrifying? Yet, I’m sure it’s much deeper than a movie trailer, much propaganda or a truthful vision of what’s to come? Thank you, it’s now on my list of must watch! The very opening scene of the trailer, brought to mind images of Fritz Lang’s “Metropolis”. Which I had been playing with for a future post, so if you see something to do with it, please don’t be surprised. πŸ™‚

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          3. I often wonder if Orwell and other writers like him, had some foreknowledge of future events. It’s an interesting idea, maybe it should be explored. πŸ˜‰

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        1. Thank you, Ogden, I always enjoy your replies, for they create a cascade thoughts, one thought to another, to another, and so on. Indeed, how will the future look back on 2020, will it be truthful or sanitized with an agenda of an unnatural order? Only time will tell, and if we cross our fingers now will in shape what’s to come? πŸ˜‰ Maybe so! πŸ’–

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          1. Orwells style is way ahead of H G Wells, not surprising perhaps since he came 40 years or so after him, but what a change in style in that time! Wells books seem rooted in a sort of zealous imperialist dream of trying to “fix everything” whereas Orwell is much more to do with the individual, and his / her response. Freud would have been brand new at the time, but Orwell fits into that frame very well

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          2. Thank you, Ogden. Do you think we could consider Orwell clinically unsettled? I don’t at all mean that in a bad way, rather he was able to see beneath the surface of shiny objects. I know he had health challenges as well. But seeing the world in a different light than most everyone else, would take a toll. Would you start with the self and work outwards? Perhaps he was able to decipher the minutiae, making everything remarkably intimate and transfer that ability onto the pages? He would certainly be an interesting case study. πŸ™‚

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          3. He had a very strange disposition I think – there’s is no sign of nationalism or spirituality, total lack of faith! Perhaps he loved women more than he cares to admit? Its been a while since I read him, but I think perhaps the women in his books were more “pure” than the men? Its kind of rude to suggest that women are no better than men, even today, so perhaps that was reserved territory?

            I wonder what made Freud tick? Other than looking out rather than in? What on earth was going on in there? I imagine these giants of academia lived in and through their studies, total dedication, such as we don’t find anywhere today. Not now that all the big causes have been busted and blown open – nowadays, if your dedicated to something, you’re probably either mad or bad! πŸ˜€ I don’t trust anyone who isn’t half hearted! πŸ˜€

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          4. I think Orwell was an intellectual introvert, watching and analyzing was his drug of choice. Perhaps there was a real awkwardness in how he interacted with people. I believe he did think he loved women, yet for a reason I can’t explain, it seems as though he felt unworthy of receiving real love. I know some of his intimate relationships were tarnished by stepping outside of them. Speculating here, fulfilling the self-defeating cycle of β€œI’m no good, I’m not deserving” with his self-sabotaging behavior. Do you think Orwell would have opened up to Freud? I’ve often have an image of Freud saying, β€œah” and rubbing his hands together like a fly, the ultimate voyeur. Academia is an insulted cloistered bubble. πŸ™‚

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          5. I’m talking utter nonsense as usual – of course there are lots of people dedicated to single causes, just that I mean, we need to save everything, not just the whales, but also the fishes, and the elephants and bats! So many things are going, or already gone, its like we went over the cliff already, and its a bit late to think anything without blowing a fuse –

            Oh yeah, about Orwell, and being the future, I like that he talked about TV controlling everyones lives – so prophetic!

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          6. Thank you for the smile! Is there such thing as a single cause, or is there just a bigger picture? The ones able to triage a situation and implement the needs (best for all) are never popular, not everyone will be happy. That’s just how it is.

            Yes, mind altering for sure, how did Orwell know? What would everyone do without TV, social media and all internet services? Let’s see, turn it off! Maybe everyone would back away from the cliff. πŸ˜‰

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          7. A lot of English educated in those days were shaped by their experiences in boarding schools – separated from parents and given the old “stiff upper lip” treatment – that system has a lot to answer for.
            On another note, I’m often in awe of that post war generation, the last of “old England” or the old system – only about 5% of the population got a good education, and many of those felt obliged to reach out to the rest of us. I met a few of them when I was in education about 20 years ago, and these were the last of them going into retirement. They had a vision – a kind of brotherhood working towards a better Britain – it was really something to meet these dedicated to service kind of people. I”m sure it had been drilled into them – the system then was called the 11+. if you did well aged 11, you were streamlined for a profession, or even university, only a tiny percent had that experience, but then over the years nearly half now go, and for different reasons, and less of the old rilling classes and so on. Its all changed! Some good some bad about it all.
            I’ll bet Freud thought he’d found a gold mine when he came to England! LOL Except here, everyones mad, but no one admits it!! πŸ˜€

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          8. Dear Ogden, would academic selection (11+) be politically incorrect by today’s standards in the UK? I read that it is still in effect re: certain scenarios in the UK. Please correct me if I read your words wrong and if these are untruths that I read about. Altruism is universal, even in education. There are good people everywhere willing and able to share the intellectual wealth they’ve had the pleasure to receive. Is that really true, “everyone’s mad”, is seem your humor is so very different than ours (I do like what I can understand of it). πŸ™‚

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  2. My, Mia, you’ve chosen a perfect time for this post ~ “This is the direction the world is going in at the present time…in our world, there will be no emotions except fear, rage, triumph and self-abasement… there will be no loyalty except loyalty to the party, but always there will be the intoxication of power…the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face forever…”

    He speaks of such a sad future, and also speaks very clearly to the moral to be drawn from such a nightmare scenario: “don’t let it happen, it depends on you.” Yes, indeed. As bleak as he begins, he also lets us know the power of change is in our hands as long as we act. Thank you for this.

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    1. Dear Randall, thank you for your most thoughtful reply. Orwell’s comment at the end of the video puts so much in perspective for me, and I find the term “self-abasement” just perfect in a most unsettling way. Indeed, it is up to us. I have thought of you over the last many months, never sure where you are or the political climate of your location. I find the idea of safety now holds hands with wellness, strange how things evolve. I hope that you are safe and well. Take good care! ~ Mia

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      1. It is funny you mention the term “self-abasement” as this is what fully captured my attention in this clip ~ it is unsettling perfect in this perspective. Globally, I think the political climate is simply insane – countries so concerned about their state of affairs, are pushing the boundaries of humanity with impunity. I’m stunned to be witnessing what is currently happening in the US…and wonder if I am just becoming more cynical as I grow older, but then just a look at history & history repeating itself answers this question πŸ™‚
        Wishing you well, Mia, and above all moments in the day which bring a great smile. ~ Take care.

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        1. Hi Randall, are we cynical, or with age do we start to view the world with an ever changing set of eyes? I believe the eyes for some become more compassionate. History is a cruel and mean machine, I’m hopeful the future will bring new drivers that will take the machine in a new direction.
          Thank you for the exchange of words, wishing you a lovely day!

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    1. Thank you David, so true. Interesting word, I just noticed this: manifestation => man infestation. Laughing, I’m either super sharp or sadly super not sharp and everyone else already learned this one long ago. Yesterday, I had Leonard Cohen’s, “Hallelujah” playing on an autoloop in my head. I guess it’s what I needed.

      “You can’t always get what you want
      You can’t always get what you want
      You can’t always get what you want
      But if you try sometimes, well, you just might find
      You get what you need”

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