Mockingbird

Ilse Bing – Ellen Auerbach, 1949. Photos, Big Sur California 1949.

 

Mockingbird

 

Beneath a yellow autumn sky
Rain fell heavy: cast-iron buckshot
Pierced a flapping storm-soaked umbrella
Open-shut open-shut
A mockingbird injured in mid-flight
Grounded, wretched and wild
Hung in the closet
Skin-to-suit drip-dry

Been pushed aside
Punished long and hard
Stood in the shade of blue
Shut all the windows
Barricaded the sun and moon
Swallowed pride: bones and all
Choked up life: the charred remains
Slept in the grave, bedside

Woke — Realized

You and your pseudo avant-garde lifestyle
Experimental cologne: Raid
Innovative mouthwash: RID
Both acid-base slow-release
Intoxicating airborne pheromones
Kept me listening to your half-truths
Alliterations and slant-rhymes
When in reality you’re just a postmodernist
Full of incompleteness, living an unresolved life

 

“What is real is not the external form, but the essence of things… it is impossible for anyone to express anything essentially real by imitating its exterior surface.”
— Constantin Brancusi

 

Video — “Great photographers. Ilse Bing”

Mockingbird was originally posted February 01, 2016.

 

Copyright © 2016 Mia Pharaoh. All rights reserved.

. . . . . . . .

Advertisements

115 thoughts on “Mockingbird

    1. Yay! Thank you Antony! You know to tell you the truth, I have been in love with this Ilse Bing photograph from the first time I saw it. There’s a very personal connect between the photo and the words, so I’m really thrilled that you enjoyed the poem. Always lovely to see you here! ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  1. I can feel a bit of scathing feelings underneath it all. The innocent bruised and wounded, but not yet quieted is there to pack a punch!
    Stunning photography to accompany your speaker’s sentiments!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thank you for this. I do a lot of songs written by other musicians. So, to read it, rang a bell in my head, get to the core of the matter, the essence, get to the meat of a song, the reality, not just an imitation.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It’s funny because when I saw the photo you chose for this, I thought it was very much like a Francesca Woodman photo. Hahaha.
    “Kept me listening to your half-truths
    Alliterations and slant-rhymes
    When in reality you’re just a postmodernist
    Full of incompleteness, living an unresolved life”
    –HA! Love this part. Postmodernism and the ‘creating’ of one’s own truth. As if one could actually create their own truth. Truth can’t be created. It must be discovered.
    🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Staci, you are very perceptive. I love the work of Francesca Woodman, and have used it along with some other posts here. With this blog I’ve been trying to introduce photographers that may be new to some, it’s really interesting what the camera lens is able to capture. In a sense this site has become a tool to understand (as you say discover) the complexities of the emotions and actions that surround or are associated with this thing we call love. I’m really pleased that you liked the postmodernism reference, as it was a comparison to the avant-garde/modernism movement, which of course is my preference. Although, I do think each has its place. Please enjoy your Sunday have a wonderful week ahead, wishing you and your family the best! ~ Mia

      Like

  4. Oh Mia, I’m so sorry it’s taken me so long to reply. It’s because we are having Carnaval right now in Brazil, and it goes Friday night (last Friday) to today. The kids have been out of school and we’ve been busy.
    Yes, Francesca Woodman. Have you seen the documentary that was made about her with her parents? Quite the life actually. Her photos seem quite deep and sociologically current, yet it seems like her mother thinks Francesca just thought up ideas she would think was interesting and did it. She would get excited about her idea like a young girl. You can watch it on Youtube if you like.
    Thank you for such a lovely reply to my comment and please have a great Wednesday.
    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Staci, I hope you’re having a wonderful time! Please, no apology necessary. I have seen the documentary “The Woodmans” several times. It’s really very interesting as it’s presented mostly from the perspective of her parents. I do think it would be amazing to be surrounded by art and other artist all the time, but also very difficult, trying to find your own place and voice in the art world, which now we see that she did just that. (The mother, well…???) Sadly, Francesca is not able to see how much the world loves and appreciates her photography and the statements that she was able to make with her work, which for me is a tragedy. I think her passions and angst while living life was captured in her work like so many other great artists that have suffered the “struggle”. Thank you for your marvelous reply, please enjoy the rest of your week! ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hahaha. I had to smile at your remark, “The mother, well…?” Yea, hmmmm…
        I think her mother was really not present in Francesca’s life. At any rate, we are all individuals and have the deeper most longings in our hearts, right. Like you said, it is presented mostly from her parents point of view.
        I agree with you. Being surrounded by art and other artists would be AMAZING! I would love it actually. It could get hairy though, being that artists are generally temperamental and can get moody. And then you have the flaky ones and the ones that think they’re better than everyone else. I’ve been reading a book on creativity and one of things mentioned in it is that the artists during the Renaissance created in community. “…faith and imagination, was largely a result of the coming together of communities or schools of artists.” (quoted from the book). Arriving at the Impressionism era, these communities of artists didn’t exist so much any more. Impressionism artists could be described as “a gathering of individuals and loners.” Just look at Van Gogh. He said, “Gauguin says that when sailors have to move a heavy load or raise an anchor, they all sing together to keep them up and give them vim. That is just what artists lack. Of course now-a-day, industry is what matters, so that makes it even worse.
        Anyhow, now I’m rambling. Haha. Sorry 🙂
        You also have an amazing rest of your week Mia. So great to meet someone to have ‘meaty’ conversations with.
        🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Staci, you know when I watched the documentary the first time there was something disturbing about Francesca’s mother, Betty. There is an odd sort of cold distance when Betty talks about Francesca. At one point during the film she said something to the effect of, “I guess I was a bad mother”, and “we didn’t know how poorly Francesca was doing emotionally”. It’s just a gut feeling and Betty does appear to be extremely controlling, especially because I thought the film would be primarily focused on Francesca, but we do see a lot of Betty’s artwork, the ceramics and cloth painting, along with her huge installation towards the end of the film. We see very little artwork created by her father, George. As a matter of fact when George talks about his daughter, you get a feeling/sense of a genuine love and admiration for his child, Francesca. So much so that he has practically immersed himself only in photography from some time in the 1980’s after Francesca’s death. My thoughts are all from memory, so there could be some discrepancies and inconsistencies without watching the film again. I wasn’t there and I don’t know the family dynamics, just what was caught on film, which is very telling if you asked me.

          Your reading sounds very interesting, thank you for sharing that quote, and yes, everything is so very different than it once was. It’s a very competitive and cut throat world out there, and for most people the arts take a backseat, sad! I like that you mentioned Van Gogh and Gauguin, they had a very interesting and at times intense relationship, truly fascinating.

          I’ve gone on and on, thank you for an inspiring reply, “meaty” which I very much enjoy as you can hopefully tell. Please enjoy the rest of your week as well! Thanks for a great exchange of words!
          ~ Mia

          Liked by 1 person

  5. The music and photo set a mood to this poem that is almost unmatched. And then your poem finishes the thought “Choked up life, from the charred remains, While I slept in the grave — bedside” and one of the best moments in life is when someone is able to come to the realization that when the one they are with is ~ “Full of incompleteness, living an unresolved life.” Only then does the adventure truly begin. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ryan, thank you for a lovely comment, I truly appreciate your kind words. I would like to share this with you, the two poems of yours that I read last night have been tumbling around in my head since reading them, this is really a wonderful thing! I’m looking forward to reading much more. Please enjoy the rest of your week, may it be filled with inspiration and creativity. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Rob. “Scathing” is the perfect word. I’m pleased and delighted that our paths have crossed as well. I’m enjoying your posts and writing style, and love the HUMOR!

      In rereading this (I forget what I write, ha-ha 😉 ) “avant-garde” reminded me I was going to send you a link to a short experimental film
      —>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSY0TA-ttMA
      “Meshes of the Afternoon” with Maya Deren. I love it, it’s surreal, great camera angles, etc. Only watch if you feel like it. Okay I was wrong, it’s not 10 minutes it’s 14. If you do watch it, let me know what you think, and I hope you enjoy this sort of old stuff.

      Liked by 1 person

          1. Have you read it? I was thinking of doing the Surrealist suicide series and I am planning that out. Also thinking about out there erotic classics series, de sade, mirbeau, the story of o, the iage etc. Not sure it is a good idea though

            Liked by 1 person

          2. No, I haven’t. I like the idea of the Surrealist Suicide Series, an Erotic Classic Series would be of interest too. I suppose you know your audience and what you want to attract. However, not everyone that reads it, will read it as you intend it.

            Liked by 1 person

          3. No, not at all. I happen to think it would be an excellent title for a series, and truly it could go in so many directions. Come on, don’t you think it’s perfect for the Surrealists? When I’m kidding, I’ll let you know. I’m not kidding, I really do think it’s a great idea. Hell, you could write a book!

            Liked by 1 person

          4. I think you have some sympathy as well. I take it from your comments on Paramore’s Canary and sitting Shiva that you were raised Jewish…the Book of Job is were Satan first makes his formal appearance, the relationship between God and Satan is a curious one to say the least in this particular episode

            Liked by 1 person

          5. So you know the tradition of Sitting Shiva, it can be very intense. What goes on under the shrouded mirror is pretty fascinating. True, it is a curious one, what’s been recorded has been sanitized, and not accurately documented. I’m going to send some readers of comments into a complete frenzy with this. (You do know that their relationship had been stressed for quite some time.)

            Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Aruna, I believe the mockingbird is sad. I think we go through a wide range of feelings at the end of any type of relationship. I’m pleased that you liked the video. Please take good care. ~ MiA

      Like

  6. The video reminded me of the power of capturing sound. They – sound and video – are both the same thing in many ways, proving art can be captured as well as created – not always the same thing. Random thought – ‘words mean nothing if the author knows what he/she has written’. To me it’s where the writer’s words travel to by themselves that means the most – Google Earth brain picking up random instructions . Your words made the journey big time, Mia. I liked the powerful, punch in the face mood swing after ‘Woke — Realized’. Clever ~ JGC

    Liked by 1 person

    1. JGC, thank you. The images of Ilse Bing set to “Cinnamon Girl” give them an edge and me an edgy feeling, which works perfectly with the last stanza of the poem, especially because Bing is considered a hero, a goddess of the interwar avant-garde. There is everything magical about art, even more so if art has wings (“writer’s words travel to by themselves”) and allowed to be free, not bound by eyes and ears that seek to own and control creation. When art is unencumbered it knows no limits, and if creation is allowed to drive the car, the results are spectacular. So, I agree, I think they are/can be the same thing. I suppose that we’re all in constant state of sleep-wake when it comes to injustices, and there are so many big injustices taking place around the world that the small ones often go unnoticed. Perhaps it’s important to shine a light on the little ones too. I hope the metal work is going well, and has wings! ~ PM

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Thanks for the explanation, PM. Art makes the brain work better and put to good use can shine a light on anything it wants. Metal is being mastered and I’m hoping it ends up being art. ~ JGC

        Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Chris! Haha, Monday deserves a good rant, after all it’s Monday! Thank you, I’m so pleased that you like the buckshot line. Another favorite, photographer Ilse Bing. I had a good look at that tub today too and noticed that very same thing, the grunge, hoping the inside was pristine for Ellen Auerbach. Actually, I think you’d like Big Sur, gorgeous coastline and filled with inspriation, it’s a place you drive through on your way from L.A. to San Francisco if you’re taking the coast. I would love to live there. Thank you, Chris, for your terrific comment. Please have a great week too! ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  7. You have a remarkable talent, young Mia. Turning words into purest art, those words having layer upon layer of valid alternative interpretations while maintain a spine of consistency throughout is no mean feat. A ‘bravo’ moment, methinks.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s