In The Mourning

Photographer Sally Mann

 

In The Mourning
100 Words Only

Death did its part, shock and denial offered their condolences: time, it passes too.  Beneath a star-spangled ceiling, counting beliefs and misfortunes as sheep, waiting for sleep to take hold, my mind flashes neon forget-me-nots, signs of Elvis and vows taken.  Taken they were, in all but a moment, time enough to empty the chamber.  The chips, they did fall — sound with the jingle-jangle of spent shell casings.  Remnants of carnations linger sickening-sweet, like cotton candy on sticky fingers in the summer’s heat. Memory’s ghost hugs my curves like a fitted sheet, a second skin, while whispering soft-nothings: promises made.

 

“If two people love each other there can be no happy end to it.”
― Ernest Hemingway

Tango With Lions – “
In a Bar

                                                                      Or Flames

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75 thoughts on “In The Mourning

        1. I published, I couldn’t find it in the reader. WP published it with the date of Nov. 7th. I then changed the time and date, and updated. I couldn’t find it in the reader again, so I created a new post… fun!

          I’m glad you like it Rob, I’ve been waiting to use it, they have some others I really like as well. Also WP changed its format, now I have to put the video in the first comment otherwise the image in the reader will be a YouTube video, and I don’t want that. There used to be a work around for that, not any more, well I can’t find one yet.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I’ve read that you can set a “featured image” and that will show the picture instead of the photo. I haven’t tried that, though. I have noticed that videos have been given priority over photos. I hope that is with youtube only. If that happens with uploaded videos, then I’m in big trouble. 😉

            Liked by 1 person

  1. This is filled with so many beautiful phrases like, “counting beliefs and misfortune as sheep,” and, “Memory’s ghost hugs my curves like a fitted sheet.” Such melancholy- the photo, the quote, and the song all tie in together. Nicely done, Mia.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Vic, thank you so much for your generous and kind words. I’m pleased that the feeling of melancholy came across. Sally Mann’s photography is wonderful, I could use her work with every post. And Hemingway is my guy, for sure! 😉 I think the song is truly sad in so many ways, but oddly hopeful too, so for me it was a must use. Wishing you a wonderful Monday afternoon, please have a terrific evening, be well Vic. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I have read this three times now because I know how subtle you are Miss Cranes and how easy it is to miss your finely tunes nuances. First of all love the pun in the title which suggests to me, as the subsequent prose poem a hint of Joyce and/or maybe Beckett. It also suggested to be a crazy alchol fuelled vegas romance that turned tragic, though I am sure that there are a myriad of variant readings. I like the beliefs as sheep and the star spangled ceiling and the jingle jangle of shell casings and basically everything. Anyway this is one of my favourites, so captivating yet elusive. Well done Miss Cranes

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you Mr. Cake for a lovely comment. Should I worry, how good is it to be elusive, telling everything, while saying nothing? 😉 “What happens in Vegas stays in Vegas”, not sure who to attribute that to., hmm… maybe a movie. Can I safely say, most romances turn tragic, (Hemingway did) or is that too dire? I’m on a roll, ha-ha. I’m really pleased that you liked some of the catchy phrases. Thank you again. ~ Miss Cranes

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Already said: what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas. I’m imagining a film reel with something like Natural Born Killers rolling by without sound. I don’t always like quotes, but when I do they are by Hemingway. 😜

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Excellent 100 words, Mia. While death has not parted me and Laurie, we have both come very close to being parted by death — me more than once, but Laurie once, but she came closer to dying than I have, which we didn’t realize until we started to treat her symptoms. One thing we learned is that living on the edge of death either strengthens your love and marriage or it breaks it apart. It strengthened our love, marriage and determination, but I’ve seen too many couples fall apart over serious illnesses. You also discover who, in your family and among friends and acquaintances, truly cares for you and who would just as soon see you die. Being on the edge of death turns up some real surprises about who the people in your life are, and how they really feel about you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Timothy, for such a moving and honest comment. I realize what I have captured here is not the prettiest, yet, it is what it is. I agree with everything you’ve shared, the edge does bring about the make or break it syndrome, and you do find out who your true friends and family are. I’ve often wondered if “they” realize it could just as easily have be them, so they distance themselves, thinking if I can’t see it, it doesn’t exist. I’m happy to read that, “It strengthened our love, marriage and determination”. Always wishing you and Laurie the very best. Please enjoy your day Timothy. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks, Mia. I, and would bet you, try to imagine other people’s situations. It’s too easy to get all wrapped up in yourself and not be able to imagine how other people feel.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Oh dear mia!! a wonderful piece for immortal love .i m impressed from ur lines”my mind flashes neon forget -me-nots……”.i can not imazine about d impression of those lines on my mind.i feel dt i have gootten my some valuable thing.marvallous ,dear mia.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Dear Aruna, thank you very much for a beautiful comment. Often, when I remember things, they flash like signs, I’m glad that you liked that line. Wishing you a lovely day ahead, please be well my friend. ~ Mia

      Like

  6. A wonderful n uniqe piece ,u have written.i m impressing ur following lines”…my mind flashes neon forget me not……memory’s ghost hugs my curves…”.these lines r like mealstorm of my heart .marvellous….dear mia.

    Like

  7. Deep meaning in d line”forget me nots….”wonderful metaphor.i admire most ur dis post.i have gotten many valuable jewellery type words by ur dis post.i can never forget u n ur dis post.thanks mia.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Mia, you know I’m a huge Sally Mann follower, so the photo got me right away. I was curious as to how her husband is doing and came across an article about how she is doing since her son passed away. The last sentence of the article said, “contemplating the passage of time and the transience of life.” I think that’s a perfect compliment to your 100 words. Loss and grief linger and the scenes we remember are snapshots of the lives we’ve had with the departed. Excellent as always. Be well. -Chris

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hi Chris, thank you so much, and for including the quote, very profound.

      I think all of her work is exceptional. A couple nights ago I was reading several articles about her, most who are familiar with her are aware of the criticism she has received. I like what she had to say about it, this is grabbed from the article:

      Mann is amazed when people do not get the distinction between photographs—“figures on silvery paper, slivered out of time”—and reality.

      I’m not sure how her husband is doing, I know that she has been documenting his illness. I can only image the huge blow that she suffered in June with the tragic death of her son, and all the ugly media attention resurfacing.

      “Loss and grief linger and the scenes we remember are snapshots of the lives we’ve had with the departed.” Your words are so thoughtful and true, beautifully stated.

      Wishing you a wonderful Thursday, please take good care. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks, Mia… I appreciate the time you take in commenting and making the blog world a little less “solo.” Hopefully Sally and her husband are coping with all that they have to deal with and I agree that the criticisms are ridiculous. Get an early start on the weekend with a fun Friday. -Chris

        Liked by 1 person

  9. I’m drawn to your words Mia, always, these are no exception. Maybe it’s Elvis mentioned, no doubt it is, but suddenly I have to go listen to George Michael sing “John and Elvis are dead”, and no doubt there is a connection there too. Thank you again for a wonderful read. Daniel

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Good morning Daniel, thank you for your lovely comment. “How come peace, love and Elvis are dead?” I don’t believe in coincidences, just arrows to follow. 🙂 Please enjoy the rest of your week, and thank you again. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Death is always a difficult. Especially the deaths that surprise us, “shock,” us. The “star spangled banner” gave me some thoughts. Perhaps we are not only talking about the death of a loved person, married by Elvis. Perhaps this is the death of the US. Tones of the state of politics lately? The chips falling like “shell cases” at Memorial Day reference? I do very muchh relate to that sickening smell of carnations at funerals. My Mom would get so upset inside, when my Dad gave her carnations for their anniversary or holiday. She called them “death flowers.” Lucky Dad did learn. And in the end memories of dead ones do haunt us. I would like to think there is always hope. John Donne shared a different view of the death of a partner. His poems “Death Be Not Proud” and especially, “A valediction Forbidding Mourning” express the idea that love is eternal and that in the end, death is not the end.

    Beautiful writing as always Mia. Enjoy your Thursday.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Amanda, it’s always difficult, even more so when it’s unexpected. You’re on point with, “the death of a loved person, married”, this ended up being a somewhat deeply personal effort. The smell of carnations completely undoes me, especially as they grow old and have a powdery scent, it’s a memory trigger for sure and I agree with your mother wholeheartedly.

      Thank you for sharing John Donne, I love the final lines of “Death Be Not Proud”.

      “One short sleepe past, wee wake eternally,
      And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die.”

      Lovely, his words imply the idea of death to death, brilliant.

      Thank you Amanda for your lovely and thoughtful words, again I have to say, as always you know exactly where my mind travels. Thank you for your kind wishes, I hope that you are enjoying your Friday, please have a wonderful weekend as well. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Mia, I’m a little distracted imagining anything pressed against your curves…even memory’s ghost. Sorry, my nature burst forth for just a moment, ha! Your works are always so deep and fascinating…liking figuring out a mystery. Neon forget-me-nots and soft whispers of promises made certainly resonate. Hope you’ve had a wonderful weekend 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Michael, I’m glad that you liked that line! 😉 Thank you for your lovely comment, yes, I agree a bit of a mystery. I did have a wonderful weekend, I hope you did too. Have a terrific week ahead. Take good care Michael. ~ Mia 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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