Trône’s Inamorata

Photographer Rimel Neffati

 

Trône’s Inamorata


Conflict and river banks
Are more pronounced,
Days of constant meandering.
Men-at-arms have all but receded,
Whispers of footsteps
Have given way,
Passage too.
All that remains,
Battlefield’s bare-bones
And ghost footbridges;
Once crossed
Without delay.
A certain silence
Rings the bells of grief,
In a land of memories;
Bitter, not so sweet.

 

“We are forlorn like children, and experienced like old men, we are crude and sorrowful and superficial — I believe we are lost.”
― Erich Maria Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front

Wolf Larsen — “If I Be Wrong”                                                      Passionate      Fragile

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89 thoughts on “Trône’s Inamorata

  1. I remember the book and movie “All Quiet on the Western Front”…very powerful. Your writing and the image…young love lost in battle and the general horror of wars gone but not forgotten? A wonderfully sweeping and intense poem.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Michael for your lovely words. Very powerful, in fact so powerful (forgive me if you know this) that the book was banned and burned in Nazi Germany. So true, “gone but not forgotten”. Never. On a brighter note, please have a wonderful Monday and a terrific week ahead. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Have you read Grass’s My Century …it features a conversation between Remarque and Ernst Junger. A dialogue between two men of letters one a pacifist and the other a military man (among others thing). It is interesting. Beautiful poem, as always I have to re read it to get all the nuances.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m fascinated by Junger, can someone with dubious political views also be a great writer? Pro-war, a proto-fascist, though not a Nazi, friend to Picasso and Cocteau during his time in Paris during WWII, one of the first people to stop acid with Hoffman, I don’t know what to make of him. A master stylist and a fore runner of magic realism. Hmmm

        Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you
        that fatness me with your articles and friendship.
        My Monday was until now very boring between work and other things…
        I would leave for Pluto 🙂
        I wish you a good day My
        Love for you ❤

        Liked by 1 person

          1. Here it is almost evening also this day for me is slipping away.
            Now it is fine the temperature dropped very
            then I have some days that it rains in Rome
            however, that’s okay 🙂
            I hope that you’re having a good time, greetings from Rome.
            Love ❤

            Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree, even I find it haunting, and personally very emotional. I was a little concerned about the title, wasn’t sure if many would know the meaning of “Inamorata”. I tried a few substitutes, but they didn’t convey my intent. Rimel Neffati’s work captures something special for me, I use it often, perhaps more than I should. Thank you Mr. Cake. ~ Miss Cranes

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ah! The Battle of the Somme! The Great War is my thing, Mia. I’ve been slowly researching it for a fiction piece I’m writing. An excellent poem, especially in the context. Fighting through dense wood, movement restricted, days of meandering indeed. Nicely done!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Meg, really? I’m fascinated by both World Wars, but The Great War, oh my! Is your piece a short story or chapter book? Best of luck with your research, I hope that you will post some excerpts. Thank you for your very generous and kind comment. Enjoy the rest of your day. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

      1. It’s a serial fiction piece -a skeleton of a novel I will eventually flesh out. I post WWI poetry, related history, biography and so forth as well as a few of my own poems with The Great War as a theme. I got off track last week because of travel but I generally post something every week. Thank you and I hope the rest of your day goes well, too!

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Mia, your beautifully haunting poem
    and the quote from “All Quite on the Western Front”
    are two shadows dancing hand in hand.
    You’ve surpassed yourself.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Mia, WWI…awesome… It feels like the last of AQOTWF just after Paul is shot. Sad and defeated. For some reason I’m focused on “inamorata” and reading into the poem the end of a relationship after hardship between the partners. Maybe the photo has me thinking that, but either way this another great poem. Be well. -Chris

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Chris, thank you for your wonderful comment and thoughts. “Sad and defeated” is perfect. I’m glad you picked on “Inamorata”, it is about the end of a relationship. I was writing about The Capture of Trônes Wood from the perspective of all the women and their attachment to the men that they loved and lost. Please take care and enjoy the week.
      ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  6. A lovely well written but forlorn piece. You speak of these places where soldiers no longer March and battles no longer occur. But perhaps the ghosts of the past linger and the structures of Marching armies are still in place such as you write “bare bone battlefields” and “footbridges.” It’s not bad they are gone. I think there is relief but their is also the “grief” for what was lost — who was lost. When I read the quote you had with the music. It occurred to me that we are “lost.”

    The reason is because there has been war forever and we never learn. It’s so easy for us to forget. We feel such grief and sorrow at the time, but years go on, and we forget. That makes us “superficial” because we forget the cost of war — lives, people like us. It happens with WWI and WWII etc. You chose an amazing book to quote from, I read it in high school. It was frightening and captured this feeling — those of us at home, those of us grandchildren etc of those who died and fought do not realize the awful truth, — this was real. People had to survive or die in this — people barely people 19 and 20 year olds.

    Love how you created this three-way experience. It’s really well done and powerful. – Mandi

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Mandi, thank you. I’m so happy to read your thoughts and wonderful comment. You’re very accurate in your capture of my intent with this effort. I think “forlorn” is perfect, it speaks to those lost and those left behind. I find the ghosts of war linger forever, and the grief of the loss is shared by everyone. Delighted that you liked the quote as well, interesting to view the perspective from both sides. True, “do not realize the awful truth” perfectly stated, I agree, it was very real. I think we can commemorate those lost by never forgetting the sacrifices made. Thank you again Mandi.

      On a much brighter note, I want to wish you a wonderful and creative Wednesday. Please take good care. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

          1. Hi Mia. Yes please take your time. I’m unable to work so I have more time. I suffer from depression and chronic or severe fatigue. So I do plan my days as best as possible, because I have to schedule resting days. It’s been almost nine-years since I first became ill but this post I wrote about three-years back kind of explains somethings:

            https://mandibelle16.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/writing-101-a-loss-of-ones-self/

            Have a lovely day 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

          2. Thank you Mandi, for such a lovely and understanding reply, you are so kind. Very sad to read this, smart to schedule resting days.

            I’ve read your beautiful poem, “Tears On Land” several times today, each time it reveals more. I keep thinking about it, so my comment is forthcoming (I love it). I’m going to read the link that you provided. I hope that you had and are still having a lovely day too! 🙂 ❤

            Liked by 1 person

          3. Mandi, I would love to read parts II and III, will you please provide me with the links if you’re comfortable. Now, I can tell you that a times I have difficulty focusing and writing comments, I know you get it. 🙂 ❤

            Liked by 1 person

          4. There is no real part 2 or 3. At least not that I’m aware of. But here is a more recent article I wrote for a guest post on another blog.
            Some of it you’ve read. I must note, although the medication change in 2015 helped me, I’m still not able to work even part time. I don’t last with friends 5 hours usually about three and if I push it four (then it takes two days to recover). Mentally I’m improved but the medication clozapine caused more weight gain and I can’t keep up with the yoga or walking, as I have found with any type of physical exercise. It’s frustrating but you get by right? And keep going 🙂

            Thanks Mia for wanting to read these. Enjoy your Thursday!

            https://luckyottershaven.com/2016/04/24/guest-post-12-the-journey-inspired-coping-with-depression-with-severe-fatigue/

            Liked by 1 person

  7. I just finished watching the BBC series “Our World War” on Netflix. Your wonderful piece added.much to my thoughts about this period of time. Both of my wonderful grandfathers were in France during the great war, I am prevlidged to have many of their stories floating around in me from childhood. I really enjoyed this. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Daniel for your wonderful words, they’re always a delight for me. I’m pleased to have been able to add to your thoughts. Having two grandfathers in France during The Great War is something, and to have their stories and memories, a gift. Thank you again, I’m happy that you enjoyed this. Please take good care. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  8. You capture the distinct horrific but oddly engaging feel of war and disruption with this poem. Places never lose the feel of history, especially when it has so much to say – take the quote along with your words, and you bring the feeling of the past to the present. A beautiful way with words Mia…also, love the choice of music as well 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Randall, thank you for your kindness and for sharing your thoughts with me. Perfect, “disruption” so true, everything can change forever in a blink. I think that many significant places in history hold onto a strong and strange energy, maybe because of the events that took place there. I agree with you, Wolf Larsen’s song, “If I Be Wrong” certain made the post for me, her music is hauntingly beautiful, I’m delighted that you enjoyed it. I hope all is well with you Randall, please take good care. ~ Mia 🙂

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