Ponds of Tears

Jewish Couple Wearing Yellow Stars – Photographer Unknown

 

Ponds of Tears
10 Words Only


Arrive with a whimper, leaving the world a Cheyne-Stokes whisper.

 

“The life of the dead is set in the memory of the living.”
― Marcus Tullius Cicero, Philippics  MisstepFleeting

The photograph above is of a Jewish couple in the Budapest ghetto wearing yellow stars on their jackets.  These badges were just one of the many psychological tactics used by the Nazis to isolate and dehumanize the Jews of Europe.

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29 thoughts on “Ponds of Tears

  1. A striking photograph.. Great line and a beautiful tribute Mia! My great aunt often told us about a little Jewish girl that her mom and dad had to hide. Terrible times..
    May you have a lovely week ahead!
    ~ Dajena 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Dajena, thank you! The photo really speak for itself, I feel my words could never capture the same strength and sentiment as the image. Thank goodness for incredibly brave individuals like your great aunt’s parents. It was a horrific time in history, I am grateful, holding a very special place in my heart for the Free French. Likewise, I hope that you have a lovely week and I look forward to seeing some more of your delightful drawings!
      ~ Mia 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  2. You can see the story in their eyes. My stepdad was in the tank division that liberated Buchenwald which he said was the most horrific sight he’d ever seen. Whether by stars or tattooed numbers people should never be branded. Kudos to the current oldest man alive that also survived Auschwitz. Thoughtful post Mia. *Hugs*

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I completely agree, I think the photo is amazing. I felt very few words were needed to convey my thoughts. You can’t see me, but your comment has brought tears to my eyes, thank you for sharing. I am grateful and thankful for those like your stepdad, I truly appreciate your kind words, hugs back!

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Chris, for a lovely comment. Very true, I agree “horrific”. This was a challenge for me because the image is so strong and powerful, I think it really does tell a story on its own, my greatest hope was to do it justice. Thank goodness for “resilience”! ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Brilliant. An excellent use of the Cheyne-Stokes condition. Plus, I love that word, ‘whisper’.
    Have you ever heard the song, “Moon over Birkenau”, by song-writer and musician, ‘Steve Bell’? It’s part of a CD he did called, ‘Symphony Sessions’. His story behind his own personal experience visiting Aushchwitz is a strong one. You can read about it and listen to the song here (if interested):
    http://blog.stevebell.com/2015/01/moon-over-birkenau-on-the-70th-anniversary-of-the-liberation-of-auschwitz/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your lovely words and kindness Staci. I’m really pleased that you know the meaning and reference I was making by using the term “Cheyne-Stokes”. No, I haven’t heard of the song. Thank you for the link, I will check it out. I can only imagine visiting any of the camps would be emotionally very difficult. Thank you again, I always enjoy your comments and the conversations that we have. Please enjoy a wonderful evening with your family. ~ Mia 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Thank you Staci. I did read the article, very well written and listened to, “Moon over Birkenau”, which is beautiful. I cried all the way through both, for personal reasons, although I can’t imagine that anyone wouldn’t find it emotional. Thank you for sharing this with me, sometimes it’s good to revisit the past. Please have a lovely and creative Friday and weekend! Wishing you and your family well.
          ~ Mia 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Oh, I’m so glad you enjoyed the post and song. It is definitely an emotional topic. I can’t handle watching movies that involve injustice, such as this topic and slavery too. It’s too much for me.
            You also have a very nice weekend Mia.
            🙂

            Liked by 1 person

  4. I’ve been to the graves of those who died in battle. The experience will stay glued to me forevermore. Yet, they had a chance, they were brave soldiers. The 6 million were never afforded a chance; never given a grave; identity extinguished; breath stolen; no grave; no nothing. Your ten words are both fist and flower. Brilliant.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The enormity of the death in numbers and numbers is hard to comprehend whether it’s in battle or an insult against the human race. You’ve brought it home, “identity extinguished”, for me personally this is the hardest part to understand. George, thank you for your wonderful comment. ~ Mia

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I read a quite a few of your older posts. All touch the soul, or trigger the thought, in one way or another. Why pick this one out? Because it’s subject is the one thing I’ll never – maybe never should – comprehend, certainly never forgotten; like the war graves are visual memorials, the 6 million didn’t even get that small mercy (I know ‘mercy’ is the wrong word, but can’t think of the right word). Perhaps the right word doesn’t exist.

        Liked by 1 person

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